Trade Kits



Scaffolders Scaffolders Universal Basic Universal Basic Rope Access Technician Rope Access Technician
Roofing Contractor
Roofing Contractor
Utility Services

Utility Services
Domestic Engineer

Domestic Engineer
Industrial Engineer
Industrial Engineer
Site Contractor
Site Contractor
Trade Kits (Standard MEWP) Kit 1
Trade Kits(Standard MEWP)Kit1
Trade Kits (PRO MEWP) Kit 2
Trade Kits (PRO MEWP) Kit 2
   


Trade Kits Make Working at Height Easier

When the UK government established its new work at height regulations some years ago there was no way it could take into consideration all the individual needs of the various industries the regulations would affect; that's understandable. But that's where private business comes into play. Since those regulations were enacted enterprising businesses have come up with work at height solutions individualized to various industries. Where tools are concerned, it is now possible to get specialized trade kits that will make your business more productive while at the same time keeping you safe.

In case you're unaware, a trade kit is simply a combination of tool belts, bags, holsters, and anchors specifically aimed at a particular trade. The reason behind these kits lies in the fact that different trades use different types of tools and work in different environments. A lineman might need one set of tools easily accessible as he sits atop a utility pole or pylon, while a carpenter will need an entirely different set of tools working from a scaffold or a hydraulic bucket lift.

The Importance of Holsters

One of the most important aspects of a trade kit is the number and type of holsters involved. Using the previous example of a carpenter, he may need a holster for a cordless drill, one for a hammer, and yet a third for a smaller hand tool. Having these holsters keeps his tools readily accessible for a quick draw, while still safe from fall by using a tether and lanyard system. Without these holsters the carpenter has no place to put these particular tools, other than a bucket or bag attached to the scaffolding. While such an arrangement is possible, it's certainly not as efficient as having a holster.

The Typical Trade Kit

It may sound strange to mention a "typical trade kit", in light of the fact that these kits are customized for various trades, but the fact is there are some things common to all of them. First and foremost are the anchors.

The whole point of using a work at height tool belt and/or tool bag lies in the necessity to secure tools to prevent them from falling to the ground. This is accomplished through the use of lanyards and tethers. Yet in order to use lanyards and tethers a tool belt must have some anchors. Sometimes these anchors are permanently affixed and sometimes they are removable and adjustable.

The other thing common to specialized trade kits is a bag of some sort. Some trades require extremely large tool bags, such as iIndustrial engineers and electricians, while roofing contractors tend to have smaller bags. Regardless, a trade kit bag will be shaped and designed to meet the tool needs of the specific trade. Where more pouches are needed, they will be included; where more anchors are needed, that will be the design. The fact is, in the world of construction trades one size just doesn't fit all.

When you're shopping for your trade kit make sure you look for a quality manufacturer and distributor. You want a trade kit which is properly rated for your type of work and is made with quality construction and materials. There's no point investing a lot of money in a kit that is poorly made. It probably won't withstand the rigours of the construction trades, and it might possibly prove to be unsafe.